Posts tagged history

Posted 1 year ago

jtotheizzoe:

myampgoesto11:

Images from Harmonia Macrocosmica, a celestial atlas by Andreas Cellarius published in 1660

I would like this atlas and I would like it now, please and thankyouverymuch.

Posted 2 years ago

NPR Fresh Air: Tomorrow we remember military historian John Keegan. His book The Face...

nprfreshair:

Tomorrow we remember military historian John Keegan. His book The Face of Battle (1976) began with this observation:

I have not been in a battle; not near one, nor heard one, nor heard one from afar, nor seen the aftermath. I have questioned people who have been in battle; have walked…

Posted 2 years ago

Winston Churchill absolutely shitting on people

(Source: nativeistumbling)

Posted 2 years ago



for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.
their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.



What was the lesson learned? You really don’t want to fuck with the Russians when push comes to shove. Especially their women.

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.

their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

What was the lesson learned? You really don’t want to fuck with the Russians when push comes to shove. Especially their women.

Posted 2 years ago

andwhenithappens:

albertinho:

demons:

Ordinary people. The courage to say no.

The photo was taken in Hamburg in 1936, during the celebrations for the launch of a ship. In the crowd, one person refuses to raise his arm to give the Nazi salute. The man was August Landmesser. He had already been in trouble with the authorities, having been sentenced to two years hard labor for marrying a Jewish woman.

We know little else about August Landmesser, except that he had two children. By pure chance, one of his children recognized her father in this photo when it was published in a German newspaper in 1991. How proud she must have been in that moment.

I enjoy things like this immensely.

This guy is the meaning of swag. He’s all “FUCK Y’ALL NAZIS, IMMA SIT HERE AND LOOK AT THE TREES!”

There’s a copy of this photo on display at the Topography of Terror in Berlin, as part of this huge timeline of how WWII happened. Among all of the apathy and blind faith displayed there, this was one of the only signs of dissent displayed. It made me feel a tiny bit better. 

Posted 2 years ago

sufigeek:

January 27 marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp. In 2005, the United Nations General Assembly designated this day as International Holocaust Remembrance Day (IHRD), an annual day of commemoration to honor the victims of the Nazi era.

Posted 2 years ago

These chilling images were taken during London’s Great Smog of ’52. For four days the city of London was blanketed by a poisonous smog that reduced visibility to a few yards and led to an estimated 12,000 fatalities.

…It sounds like the plot of a post-apocalyptic film, but the event opened the public’s eyes to the deadly effects of pollution and led to significant developments in environmental research, government regulation, and public awareness of the relationship between air quality and health.

(via ISO50)

(Source: wendfarm)

Posted 2 years ago

coolchicksfromhistory:

Artist Mary Blair (1911-1978) made a lasting contribution to the Disney image.  Her work as a color stylist and designer influenced Disney’s mid-century output, including films such as Alice in WonderlandCinderella and Peter Pan.  She also designed the It’s a Small World attraction for the New York World’s Fair which later moved to Disneyland before being replicated for Disney World, Tokyo Disneyland, Disneyland Paris and Hong Kong Disneyland.  Mary’s imaginative use of color and her childlike graphics made her one of Walt Disney’s favorite artists.  

On October 20th, Samuel Goldwyn Theater will be hosting a panel discussion celebrating the 100th anniversary of Mary Blair’s birth.  For the next three years a show entitled “Mary Blair - Life Choices, The Work of a Mother” will be touring Japan

Reproductions of Mary’s work can be purchased at The World of Mary Blair, run by Mary’s nieces.

Posted 3 years ago

fuckyeah-nerdery:

fuckyeah-nerdery:

So yeah, 67 years ago today, on June 6, 1944 Operation Neptune began. Neptune was part of the larger and more encompassing Operation Overlord. Tens of thousands of Allied soldiers stormed several marked beaches in waves, meeting a varied amount of German resistance. What’s worth noting is that the Americans and British were not the only two countries involved in the landings, the Polish, Norwegians, Canadians, Free French, Australians and New Zealanders were also there. Many, many died, some even before they even set foot on the beach. Indeed, some American soldiers simply drowned because their gear weighted them down. If that didn’t do it, then the raking machine gun fire - the German soldiers wisely aimed for the landing craft as soon as the doors dropped - mortars and artillery certainly did.

What’s worth noting is that the Germans didn’t believe Normandy was going to be the site of the landings. Instead, they believed that Calais was the target because it had a port and would be easier to put troops there than anywhere else. The Allies encouraged that thinking by feeding the Germans false intelligence through intercepted messages and double agents. The U.S. Army even created a fake army group, under nominal command of General George S. Patton, and based it in an area of England that would be closest to Calais. Some in Germany’s high command thought that Normandy might be the real target, but their reports were rebuffed. Rommel, for example, wanted to redeploy a panzer division closer to Normandy, but was denied. If that had happened, the landings would probably have failed.

What blows my mind is that even while Allied troops were landing on the beaches and fighting their way out, the German commanders and Hitler himself believed it was a decoy and that Calais was still the real target. That denial and hesitation to send more units to repel the invasion is probably what cost the Germans the war. If they had launched a counter-attack then and there and repelled the invasion, the war would have ended differently. The U.S. and Britain would probably be more willing to compromise and make peace, due to the possible public backlash against sending so many soldiers into a meat grinder. If that happened, then the Germans could have redirected their forces in the East to the Western Front and could have overwhelmed the Soviets.

That is not a pleasant picture: Imagine a Europe dominated by a Nazi Germany surrounded by puppet states with Britain possibly being the only truly independent European nation. Darker and much worse than that, imagine a Holocaust that never ended.

But it did end and the Nazis that didn’t escape to South America or commit suicide were caught, tried and punished for their crimes against the human race. People were freed, although, unfortunately many of them ended up under the yoke of a tyranny almost as bad as the Nazis.

But ultimately, it was because nearly two hundred thousand men stormed a series of beaches on the coast of France that a great evil, a taint on the soul of humanity was brought to an eventual end.

Edit: Yes, I’m aware it’s June 5th today. I need a calender, man.

Reblogging since it’s now June 6. :p

Posted 3 years ago
Posted 3 years ago
fuckyeahbookarts:

The History of Keep Calm and Carry On

fuckyeahbookarts:

The History of Keep Calm and Carry On

(Source: euliss)

Posted 3 years ago

Adams and Jefferson for the win!

Posted 3 years ago
fuckyeah-nerdery:

demons:

The Battle of Stalingrad took place between July 17 1942 to February 1943 and was among the largest single battle on the Eastern Front. It is marked by its brutality, disregard for military and civilian casualties, and its violent urban warfare where it was a struggle from house-to-house and street-to-street. It is amongst the bloodiest battles in the history of modern warfare with the highest estimation of combined casualties (German, Soviet and civilians) amounting to nearly two million. In November 1942, after the Red Army launched Operation Uranus, the German 6th Army found itself cut off and surrounded inside the city. Even after Adolf Hitler’s resolute belief in the “power of the will” and the value of “standing fast,” the Germans failed to break their encirclements. By February 1943, the rest of the 6th Army had either surrendered or been destroyed entirely. The crippling losses suffered by Germany’s military at this battle proved to be too much and many historians conclude that this loss marks the point in time that a victory in the war was forever lost to the Germans.In relation to the overall war, the only other battle that can even come close to being compared to Stalingrad is the Battle of Manila which saw the fiercest urban warfare of the Pacific theater.

And going by Enemy at the Gates, Russians speak with British accents.

fuckyeah-nerdery:

demons:

The Battle of Stalingrad took place between July 17 1942 to February 1943 and was among the largest single battle on the Eastern Front. It is marked by its brutality, disregard for military and civilian casualties, and its violent urban warfare where it was a struggle from house-to-house and street-to-street. It is amongst the bloodiest battles in the history of modern warfare with the highest estimation of combined casualties (German, Soviet and civilians) amounting to nearly two million.

In November 1942, after the Red Army launched Operation Uranus, the German 6th Army found itself cut off and surrounded inside the city. Even after Adolf Hitler’s resolute belief in the “power of the will” and the value of “standing fast,” the Germans failed to break their encirclements. By February 1943, the rest of the 6th Army had either surrendered or been destroyed entirely. The crippling losses suffered by Germany’s military at this battle proved to be too much and many historians conclude that this loss marks the point in time that a victory in the war was forever lost to the Germans.

In relation to the overall war, the only other battle that can even come close to being compared to Stalingrad is the Battle of Manila which saw the fiercest urban warfare of the Pacific theater.

And going by Enemy at the Gates, Russians speak with British accents.

Posted 3 years ago

ohlookhistory:

(via Image - V&A)

Crystal Palace Peep Show (‘Lane’s Telescopic View’) 1851.